Sustainability

Napier Port is committed to operating our business in a sustainable way

While we’re delivering for our customers, we’re focused on ensuring that in everything we do, we consider the impact on the land, sea and air around us. 

In this way, we aim to protect the harbour so that it can continue to thrive and be enjoyed for generations to come.

We’re on a journey of continuous improvement and we work hard to improve our environmental, social and economic performance by identifying and managing risks and finding opportunities to use our resources more efficiently.

Through new environmental monitoring and measuring programmes, we’re growing our understanding of the complex environment we operate in.  The more we know, the better equipped we are to find more environmentally-friendly solutions for our business.

We’ve been measuring our fuel consumption, waste volumes and carbon footprint, and we’re working hard to reduce all three.

Towards a lighter carbon footprint

In order to be sustainable, it’s important for Napier Port to proactively manage our carbon footprint.

While the amount of fuel that we consume reflects the size and nature of our operations, we’re working hard to bring our consumption down. Through a programme of continuous improvement, we’re moving across to more efficient forklifts as we upgrade our heavy vehicle fleet.

To cater for the increasing volumes of refrigerated containers being handled through Napier Port every year, we’ve gone up – investing in more container towers. Storing refrigerated containers in a tower rather than on the ground means that we can power them from the grid, reducing our reliance on diesel-powered generators which come with a much higher carbon footprint.

Carbon Emissions: tCO2e per TEU

In the year to 30 September 2019, our total carbon emissions were 8,428 tonnes or 0.03107 tonnes/CO2e per TEU container, down from 8,716 tonnes in 2018. This decrease is primarily due to a change in the emissions factors set down by the New Zealand Government, which dictate how carbon emissions are calculated. Using the emissions factors required prior to the change shows an increase to 8,937 tonnes.

Finding energy-efficient solutions

We’re continuously reviewing our operations and looking at ways to improve efficiencies to minimise and reduce our footprint.

We’ve installed an electric vehicle recharging station, and have begun the transition to electric vehicles as we replace our fleet of light vehicles.

After a successful trial at Napier Port’s Thames Street II depot, the first LED light tower was erected on-port this year. This is the first step in a staged roll-out that will see all our light towers converted to LED in the future. The LED technology is specifically designed for demanding operating environments like ports, and comes with a fully-automated service which brings both cost savings and safety improvements. Consuming just 580 watts, LED lighting requires less than half the energy of traditional HID lighting while producing 60% more light, and requires little maintenance.

Waste management

As part of our journey toward sustainability, we are committed to finding ways to reduce, reuse, recycle and repurpose our waste.

Our long-running partnership with local firm BioRich saw 4,621 tonnes of waste bark from our log yard repurposed into mulch last year, to be used on orchards, gardens, and planting projects around our region. We also work with local construction firms to repurpose their waste concrete into safety barriers, preventing it from going to landfill.

In the year to 30 September 2019, we sent 296 tonnes of waste to landfill and recycled 20 tonnes. This is a 72% reduction in our overall waste since last year, thanks primarily to a concentrated effort to reduce the volume of stony bark that went to landfill. But we’re not stopping there – as our sustainability work progresses, we will be exploring more innovative ideas for reducing waste and lessening our impact on the environment.

72% reduction
in waste

20 tonnes
of waste recycled

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